Stronger storms, rising seas

The consequences of global warming are apparent in New York and across the nation. Nobody wants our kids to inherit a world where storms like Superstorm Sandy or worse are the new normal. The National Climate Assessment released in May highlights the immediacy of this issue: “Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present.”

Our best chance to tackle pollution

Global warming is primarily fueled by carbon pollution, and the largest single source of this global warming pollution is power plants — responsible for 40 percent of carbon emissions nationally.  But unbelievably, for years, there have been no limits on the carbon emissions of these major culprits. If we want to tackle global warming, it’s critical to take on this largest source of unbridled pollution. And now may be our best chance.

Biggest step yet

On June 2, 2014, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed a Clean Power Plan to finally limit carbon pollution from power plants. The Clean Power Plan sets targets for 49 states, including New York, to reduce carbon from their power plants by investing renewable energy and energy efficiency, cleaning up existing power plants, and switching to cleaner fuels. Vermont has no fossil fuel power plants large enough to be covered. This is the largest action the U.S. has ever taken on climate, and exactly the leadership we need in order to influence other nations to reduce their own carbon emissions.

The fight ahead

Not surprisingly, this proposed plan was no easy win. King Coal, Big Oil, and the rest of the dirty power industry have vehemently opposed these rules for years. But Environment New York, in collaboration with our national federation and allies in the environmental and public health community stood up to this opposition by submitting more than 4 million public comments to the EPA and garnering support from more than 600 local elected officials and hundreds of small business owners.

Not more than a few hours after the long-awaited rule to curb carbon emissions from power plants was released however, did a curtain of fire from polluters begin. They vehemently and vocally opposed this critically important step for our climate and future generations, claiming it would destroy the economy. We’ve been hearing these tired arguments from polluters for decades. But they were wrong then, and they're wrong now.

We need your help

The single largest step to curb global warming pollution and give our children a better future has been proposed. It's a big deal. But it's not a done deal. We’ve launched a campaign to get information to more than 1 million Americans on the local impacts of global warming and ensure President Obama’s proposed Clean Power Plan gets over the finish line.

Global Warming Updates

News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Report: 20% Solar in Reach for New York

Solar power is growing so fast in New York that goals once considered ambitious are now seen as readily achievable, according to a new report by Environment New York Research & Policy Center.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment America

Report: U.S. power plants world’s 3rd largest carbon polluters, edging out India

As world leaders prepare to gather here for the United Nations Climate Summit next week, a new study shows that U.S. power plants alone produce more carbon pollution than the entire economies of India, Russia, Japan or any other nation besides China.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

New Report: Solar Capacity in New York Grew 30% in 2013

New York's progress on solar has helped fuel a tripling of solar energy nationwide between 2011 and 2013. In 2013, solar capacity in New York grew from 175 MW to 250 MW. 

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Report | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Lighting the Way

New York's progress on solar has helped fuel a tripling of solar energy nationwide between 2011 and 2013. In 2013, solar capacity in New York grew from 175 MW to 250 MW. 

> Keep Reading

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