News Release | Environment New York

Less Shelter from the Storm

After Hurricanes Harvey and Irma recently pummeled our coasts, Environment New York warned that pending budget proposals from the Trump administration and Congress threaten key programs that protect our communities from storm- related impacts.  The group documented threats to programs that prevent or curb flooding, sewage overflows and leaks from toxic waste sites. Environment New York also called for preventing more global warming-fueled extreme weather in the future.

“We believe in protecting our wetlands as they improve water quality, assist in flood control, provide habitat for birds and fish and only add to the recreational activities available to residents and visitors alike,” said Mayor Kelly B. Decker of Port Jervis, N.Y., in Rep. Maloney’s district.

“If there is any lesson to be learned from these devastating hurricanes, it’s that New York deserves better shelter from the storms,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “Rather than protecting our most vulnerable communities, budget proposals on the table in Washington, D.C. right now threaten coastal resiliency, remove protections for flood-absorbing wetlands, neglect funding for stormwater and sewage treatment, and expose more Americans to toxic chemicals,” Leibowitz added.

News Release | Environment New York

Mayor DeBlasio cuts pollution through improved building efficiency

Today, New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio announced new policies that will require building owners to sharply cut emissions of the pollution that causes global warming. The policies will require the 14,500 least efficient buildings in the city to upgrade their energy performance by 2030. These buildings are responsible for almost a quarter of the city’s climate-changing pollution. The city calls it “the most ambitious program of its kind in the nation.” Heather Leibowitz, State Director of Environment New York, issued the following statement praising the step forward:

News Release | Environment New York

STATEMENT SUPPORTING HISTORIC PROPOSAL TO PROTECT DELAWARE RIVER

Today, the regional multi-state agency (the Delaware River Basin Commission, DRBC) charged with preserving and restoring the Delaware River, its tributaries and watershed made a historic announcement for protecting this important local waterway by proposing to ban the oil and gas drilling practice known as “fracking” within the Delaware River Basin.

“Expanding and implementing this ban on fracking and fracking activities is crucial for the residents of New York,” stated Heather Leibowitz Director of Environment New York. “Millions of New Yorkers rely on the Delaware River for our drinking water supply—we have to guarantee that we protect this source water from the pollution threats posed by fracking, and today’s announcement is a crucial step forward in ensuring that guarantee.”

News Release | Environment New York

New “back to school” item for parents: toolkit to 'Get the Lead Out of schools’ drinking water

With “back to school” in full swing this week, Environment New York today offered a new toolkit to help parents, teachers, and administrators Get the Lead Out of schools’ drinking water.  Citing a lack of accurate information on lead contamination in water and how schools should prevent it, Environment New York is encouraging parents and teachers to put the new toolkit on their “back to school” reading list. 

“Our kids deserve safe drinking water at school,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York.  “We want to give parents, teachers, and school administrators the tools they need to ‘get the lead out.’” 

News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Pollution would get worse for Delaware River with budget cuts, new report says

Proposed cuts to EPA clean water programs would halt progress on addressing local pollution in the Delaware River, according to a new report released today.  With a deadline for Congress to approve a federal budget fast approaching, Environment New York is calling for full funding of EPA to protect the Delaware River and other New York waterways. “With progress in cleaning up the Delaware River, New Yorkers have just enjoyed a summer of fishing and swimming,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “Cutting EPA’s clean water programs would put that progress at risk.”

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